‘Get ready to cheersplode baby!’ Borderlands 3, 2019

Happy Monday everyone! I’ve just got back from a holiday, so I am writing this a week in advance. Look at me, being ahead. But just in case they release more on this, I will be behind in adding it to the end. For now this will be a quick one. Because hype, hype, hype!

The splash art for the pre-order – Borderlands 3, 2K Games, 2019

Like everyone ever, I am hyped for Borderlands 3. The first two games and the pre-sequel are three of my favourite games. I love getting together with my looter-bros and going and killing some flaming psychos for their fancy guns.
Did you ever use the screaming guns in Borderlands 2? I think it was called the bane? It literally screams every time you shoot it, as if a psycho was living inside of it. For no reason what-so-ever, it’s not a good gun at all, it is my favourite gun. It’s fun and stupid. That’s why I love it.
Not only are the games fun but their stories are so well thought out. The Pre-sequel actually made me like Handsome Jack. I felt sorry for him. Really sorry for him.

Guns with legs! –
Borderlands 3, 2K Games, 2019

I do have some reservations about the classes. I like to play Siren – nothing will live up to Maya in my opinion – but the new siren is a melee character, seemingly. That’s not usually my kind of thing. Trying to figure out who plays who in my looter-group could be difficult.
Oh and it’s Epic Store exclusive for 6 months – why?! That bugs me so much – exclusives are bad!
But that’s not too many negatives – 2 out of how ever many I could have. I am excited. Really excited.

Catch the trailer here!

Are you excited for Borderlands 3? Did you play 1, 2 and the pre-sequel? What are your thoughts on what we know so far? Leave a comment down below!

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‘Grunge is a good look for you.’ – Captain Marvel, 2019

Happy Monday folks! I somehow forgot to post last week, but my excuse was it was a super hectic week in the lead up to Easter. Seb was with me a few weeks ago and we went to see the big Superhero movie out – Captain Marvel. Check out my thoughts!

Carol Danvers as Captain Marvel, using her powers – Captain Marvel, Walt Disney Studios, 2019

We’re in the year that this librarian was born – 1995 – on the Kree planet of Hala (yes those bad guys). A member of their starforce, (Carol Dan) Vers, suffers from amnesia and recurring nightmares with an unknown woman. Yon-Rogg, her mentor and commander (played by Jude Law, in a pair of contacts which just makes him look so uncanny valley I struggled to look at him), trains her to harness her powers and not let them take over, whilst the Supreme Intelligence, who runs the Kree – and turns up looking like the person someone most respects (In Ver’s situation, it’s the unknown woman).
Long story short – Carol is on an adventure to find out who she actually is, with all the crazy Marvel shenanigans along the way!

Agent Fury and Carol Danvers, chilling in a warehouse – Captain Marvel, Walt Disney Studios, 2019

I have to say I liked Captain Marvel. It was a good date night film. We both seemed to enjoy sitting there for a couple hours and watching it. @sebonthesilvermountain has more wrong with it than I did. But I’ve never watched all of the Marvel movies, as I have no inclination to. I pick and chose which look best to me – and Captain Marvel looked interesting. I’m totally for female empowerment.
However, I’m not sure Brie Larson was the right pick of Captain Marvel. Tom Holland can hold a scene as Spiderman, but I’m not sure that Brie can as Captain Marvel. I’m interested to see how she is in Avengers before I make a final decision on her – but right now I think the plot was great and it looked stunning… but maybe she’s not right for the role?

What were your thoughts on Captain Marvel? Did you love it or hate it? Was it 1990’s enough for you? What about Brie Larson?

‘That Harley is a fop and a prat and smells like a ninety-six year-old French whore’s vajuju.’ – The Favourite, 2019

Hello everyone – long time not see! I have been having WordPress issues (for some reason it’s not loading on my google chrome) so I’m having to use incognito mode? Yeah, I don’t know either.

Queen Anne VS Queen Anne – The Favourite, Film4 and others, 2019

Last weekend, I went to see The Favourite with my Mum and Dad, before it left the movie theatre. It’s a good Friday evening activity after a long week at work.
Here’s a quick premise: It’s 1708 and Britain is at war, with France (duh.) Queen Anne is in bad health, and seems to hate governing – she prefers to do childish activities like playing cards or playing with her rabbits. Her adviser, Sarah Churchill, is basically in charge, Anne does everything she says. Sarah basically controls everything, and hates to be challenged. Queue Abigail – her cousin. Fallen from grace, Abigail gets in with the Queen and attempts to change her views on Sarah; she wants to be as in control as her cousin is. Does she succeed? (I’m pretty sure we all know the answer by now).

Nicholas Hoult is amazing in this film! – The Favourite, Film4 and others, 2019

So this was a weird movie. I wanted to see it because I was working at Hatfield House when it was filmed, so I saw a lot of the filming being done. It was really interesting seeing a film from the inside, and sitting in a theatre knowing where each scene was filmed.
It looks immaculate, and It was so interesting to see each scene take place. I liked the bit where they were running back and forth in the hallway – pushing the wheelchair the full length at full speed. That looked really fun.
I loved the power dynamics of this film. Especially the end where Anne gets all her power back, forcing Abigail into a servant’s position again. After there was this weird bit with rabbits, which I still don’t know the symbolism of it a week later. Is it about the cyclical nature of children? I have no idea. I’m not sure anyone knows really.

All in all, I really liked this film. It was weird and quirky, like All is True, which I had seen a little previously to this. I like these weird historical films. I dig them. Everyone should.

Check out the trailer down below!

It’s good to be back! What should I see next? Or read next? What would you like me to review?

No review 12/11/18

Hi all!

No review this week as I completely forgot to watch, read or do anything of note (being half way through BoJack Horseman isn’t enough!) Next week will be a review of Destiny,  as it was free on PC this week, so I will play some more and get back to you!

Sorry!

I am super sorry! I completely forgot! I think I have a serious case of the weekend brain! Leave a comment telling me what you’d like me to review! 

‘How clever, you’re dressed as your future’ – Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, 2018

Good moaning (get it, Halloween puns ahead) everyone! How are we all today? Looking forward to Halloween and Bonfire night? I know I am. Halloween is probably one of my favourite holidays – I am planning on being a Sith this year. Fingers crossed my outfit works out. So today’s review is on a spoopy (yes spoopy, not spooky) theme. Chilling Adventures of Sabrina released this week and I am hyped. You may know this from my review of the comic here. I am a massive pansy to scares, I’ve probably said before, but this isn’t that scary. Disturbing occasionally, but not scary.  I’ve barely watched any of it, so I’m going to give a comparison rather than a “real” review – Does the show live up to the comic? (No mentions of the 90s show here. I did love that, but it’s so different, it can’t compare.)

Spoilers ahoy!

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Sabrina on her birthday – Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Netflix, 2018

Sabrina Spellman is about to turn 16. On Halloween. On a blood moon. Omens, omens, omens. She spends her days hanging with Harvey, her friends and going to school On her 16th birthday, Sabrina must fully embrace her witch half during a Dark Baptism during which she will pledge loyalty to the Dark Lord Satan. However, Sabrina is torn, as she must choose between her friends and her family. Sabrina spends the days leading up to her birthday finding answers to all her questions about the ritual. Things go downhill pretty fast. Because of course they do.

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Sabrina vs Sabrina. I think they did a good job!  – Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Archie Comics/Netflix, 2018

So far, so good. They haven’t killed Harvey which I’m really happy with. In the comic he was killed off in the first few pages. I’m glad he hasn’t been killed off in this (So far. Hope I haven’t jinxed it).
Sabrina looks amazing. True style icon. I want to be her. And they’ve kept her looking a lot like Sabrina from the comic. Very happy about that. I quite like that they’ve brought the looks from the comic into the book, a lot like Riverdale, bringing the 50’s towards 2018. It adds some retro into it, and I really love it.
I’ve only seen a couple episodes, but I am loving it so far. I’m able to look past the modern issues they’ve kind of shoved into it – don’t get me started on that headteacher. He needs to be sacked. Urgh. I hate bad teachers in shows.
I think there’s only one bit of it I don’t like. The fact that they shoved it into the modern day. The comic wasn’t in the modern day – it kind of made Sabrina a better feminist. There was a reason for her to fight against the patriarchal nature of the Church of Night. Also, it made it more powerful that her dad was still in the picture and forcing her to be a part of it.

If you like Riverdale, give this a go. If you like witches, give this a go. If you like Halloween, give this a go. If you like watching tele give this a go. It’s worth it.

Have you seen Sabrina? What do you think? Love this more than the 90s show? What about the comic? Leave a comment down below! 

[Header image: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Netflix, 2018]

No Review 30/07/18

Hey all! This week has been super busy (writing for my dissertation and revising for an exam) that I’ve not had the time to do any reviewing this week! Fear not, there will be a review next week, I promise! I’ve been watching a lot of iZombie as I’ve been working, so I’ll probably have all that watched by next week!

Tell me what you’d like to have me review, it can be anything – books, movie, comics, tv! You name it, I’ll try get it done!

What do you want to see me review? I’m up for anything! Leave a comment down below!

“It’s Like a Nuclear Weapon that Grants Wishes.” – Bright, 2017

I’m giving you over to our Man on the Silver Mountain this week! We did watch and discuss this one together though – so without further ado; we bring you Bright, 2017. As per usual, you’re in for a long one! (If I have any comments to add they will be in italics!)

Hi guys, it’s me again, The Man on the Silver Mountain. During the holidays I sat down with your Librarian and we watched Bright. There were two reasons for this; firstly, we wanted to watch it, and secondly because people we had been talking to that had already seen the film were either singing its praises or ripping it to shreds and we wanted to understand why.
The Librarian said that she’d probably add her own comments on this for you guys too but I volunteered to write this as the genre space that Bright fits into (which I’ve most frequently heard dubbed “modern arcana”) is something I’ve read more of, seen more and played more of than your Librarian has. As with some of the other films I’ve talked about before I feel like Bright doesn’t deserve the backlash it’s receiving from critics or people that have missed the point of the movie.
Before I get into this though; I’ve been asked to try and dodge spoilers again but might not manage it perfectly, so if you’re not wanting to be spoiled at all for this movie, then I suggest going away, watching the film and then coming back to talk to us about it.

SPOILERS AHEAD!

For those of you that haven’t seen the trailers or are a little fuzzy on the story it kinda goes like this; in a modern setting where all of conventional history has been permeated with races and magical abilities from something akin to D&D or Tolkien-esque fantasy, a cop called Daryl Ward (Will Smith) is returning to work with his orc partner Nick Jakoby (Joel Edgerton) after time off recovering after being injured in the line of duty. Returning to work he finds himself mixed up in office politics surrounding his partner who happens to be the first and only orc police officer in the LAPD. Soon afterwards at a hectic and disturbing crime scene they find a magic wand said to be like “a nuclear weapon that grants wishes” and madness ensues as Ward, Jakoby and their only witness to the events that transpired, an elf called Tikka (Lucy Fry) are hunted throughout the city by gangs, corrupt cops, elven cultists and anyone else who seems to feel like it.

So, where to begin?
Let’s start with the setting as that seems to be what a lot of non-critics are getting caught up on. The setting and thus the story being told within it are not for purists. If you’re a hardcore fantasy fan then this might not be for you, if you’re an action/thriller kind of person then this may not be for you, if you’re a buddy cop movie kind of person then this may not be for you. If the combination of all of those things being mashed together sounds like fun to you, then you’ll probably enjoy Bright. (Even if they aren’t for you, I would say at least give it a go – don’t judge a book by it’s cover and all that.)

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Jakoby, Tikka and Ward hiding out –  Bright, Netflix, 2017

This film’s setting is not about race. In the film the fact that lines have been drawn between races; with elves being rich and beautiful, humans being… well human, and orcs being the poor, the criminals, etc. is not to draw parallels between those fantasy races and real-world racial demographics. What is does is use the fantasy races, that are all obviously visually distinct, to give the audience away of at a glance distinguish between the privileged and the downtrodden. The races focused on in the film (in spite their being nine major races mentioned in the film and seen a couple of times as in the case of a couple of centaur cops) are threefold and line up with the class system observed in America today. We can also see through the situations of the characters we meet throughout the film that the divide between middle and lower class is shrinking with more and more humans ending up in poor neighbourhoods or joining in with gang violence and somewhat illegal or less reputable activity. Even our main human character Ward is at risk of losing his home and can’t afford to maintain a good environment for his child. This film is about class divisions and not about race. Is there an element of racism on display to generate tension? Yeah, but it’s made clear by Ward telling his daughter “Everybody’s just trying to get along and have a good life. All of the races are different. Just cause they’re different doesn’t mean anybody is better or worse than anybody,” towards the beginning of the film when she asks about whether orcs are just plainly less intelligent than humans, that this isn’t as big a concern as status. Jakoby being hired seems more akin to the police hiring an ex-gang affiliate and feeling negatively towards such a decision but in the way the setting is laid out this is depicted as fantasy racism, a thing that is visual and easy for people to understand in passing.

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Leilah looking for her wand. She was a good villain – Bright, Netflix, 2017

The next couple of things I want to touch on I’ve heard from critics, or people who worship critics, more than anyone else. First off, the film was too dark and badly shot. I think we were watching different movies. It was dark, I would agree but I could always see what was going on and some of the choreographed shots during fight scenes that jumped between multiple angles were fine and allowed both the Librarian and myself to keep up with what was going on and see everything. Were there moments where the film got more hectic and jumbled? Yes, for instance there’s a scene where they enter a packed club. Ward and Jakoby end up trying to fight their way through a dancefloor occupied by a well-populated mosh pit. The camera zooms in, moves jarringly and all we can really see are the characters trying their best to keep moving in the chaos. Why shoot it like this? Simple; we’re now as confused as the characters are and it’s only when the characters regain their composure that we get a wider-angle shot to allow us to see Tikka beckoning to them as she’s found a way to escape. The way the film was shot was related to how the characters experienced it whilst not being too jarring or confusing to the casual viewer. (I agree that there was times of darkness. I couldn’t tell if it was the adaptive lighting of my tablet screen or the darkness of the cinematography.)
I’ve heard that the film had a poor story and that the characters lacked growth. Let’s tackle these two things separately as the first is easier to get through than the second. So, poor story? I wouldn’t say so, more a simple story as it’s a pretty straightforward Hero’s Journey kind of set up with the Call to Action, Reaching the Threshold, Death & Rebirth, Atonement and Return to the Norm in a big cycle.
To discuss growth of the characters we first have to talk about the characters. Let’s start off with Ward; he’s an older cop, jaded by his time on the force, focused on results and not seemingly bothered by much else. He’s a man of some principle as he resents the office politics hitting him due to his orcish partner and stands up to corruption among his colleagues. He’s flawed, sure; dismissive, unkind, sarcastic but he’s still one of the good guys when all is said and done. Now we see him blaming his partner for the injury he received that took him off duty and resenting the fact that he still has to share duties with him after returning to work. It draws him into a pretty miserable situation as the movie continues but skipping ahead a bit towards the end of the film it’s Ward and Jakoby against the world, they’re honest with each other, watching each other’s backs and the troubles from the beginning of the film are resolved at various points throughout the film, with Ward going out of his way to ensure Jakoby survives and encounter with the awesome villain that is Leilah played by Noomi Rapace, leaving himself seemingly without any way of protecting himself after the fact.

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Magic police, Kandomere (an elf) and Hildebrandt Ulysses Montehugh (a human), interrogating Ward and Jakoby – Bright, Netflix, 2017

Jakoby on the other hand is an outcast at the beginning of the film, an orc without proper tusks, raised by humans and not accepted by any of the orcs they encounter throughout the majority of the movie as he’s not “blooded” a rite of passage and ritual acceptance of young orcs as being proper orcs. He’s naïve, hopeful and trusting in spite of being harshly aware of how out of place and unwanted he is. By later in the film though given every opportunity to break or give up he finds companionship in both his fellow police officer Ward and in the elf they’re protecting Tikka, finds purpose in keeping those friends and the communities they’re dealing with as safe as he can from the violence and mayhem that’s chasing them and comes out the other end by ignoring everything including his own safety to save Ward from a burning building, an act that earns him the respect of the orcs that have labelled him an outcast for his whole life.
So there’s growth, certainly. Does it matter though? No. On reaching the point in the Hero’s Journey where our heroes return to the normal world accepting their new version of normal after what they’ve experienced the events of their night of chaos and gun fights is covered up by federal agents. As a result the only people that their growth matters to is them, Daryl Ward and Nick Jakoby. If that enough? I’d say so but we’ll have to see if it does or not in the next film considering Bright 2 has already been greenlit.

After singing this movie’s praises though do I have my criticisms? Absolutely, the movie was good but not perfect. Seeing more of the villains was one thing I’d have liked; learning more about them and their plans, or at least learning more about them as people. I’d have liked to see some of the other nine races that are mentioned several times, dwarves are mentioned but not a single stocky beard owner is highlighted in the film as far as I noticed. The main criticism that I have though is one that’s been echoed by other people too; there wasn’t enough of it. I got to the end of the film and wanted more; I wanted to know more about the universe, about the way the rest of the world had developed outside of Los Angeles with magic and magical races being real in this universe. I kinda wish it had been a TV series instead of a movie, but if that had been the case we probably wouldn’t have gotten named like Will Smith, Joel Edgerton or Noomi Rapace in the movie and the chemistry between Smith and Edgerton definitely made it better for me than not. What I can hope is that Bright 2 will be just as good if not better and then maybe we’ll see a spin-off TV show to expand the universe more at a later date.

Overall I’d give this movie a 8-9/10 with those missed points purely being down to it not giving me all I would have liked from the universe.
I hope you found this a fun read and I know your Librarian and I would love to hear your thoughts down below and if you’re interested in more stuff I’ve done I’m sure the Librarian will stick my links in here somewhere too.

Do you agree with MotSM’s comments? We’ve spent a lot of time chatting about it, with lots of people, but would love to know your thoughts! Leave a comment down below! 

[Header Image: Bright, Netflix, 2017]

‘I’m going through changes’ – Big Mouth, 2017

Good ol’ Netflix, bringing out good ol’ television shows, where I can just binge watch it. Big Mouth is about the awkwardness of growing up, something which everyone does. Though I wouldn’t be showing it to your prepubescent child anytime soon.  Definitely 18+.

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Andrew, Nick and Jessi enjoying a movie with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson in it! – Big Mouth, Netflix, 2017

Big Mouth is based around Nick Kroll and Andrew Goldberg’s childhood within the New York suburbs, with Kroll voicing his fictionalised self. If the Nick in his is exactly like him, I feel so sorry for him – his life was crazy!
Andrew has grown up faster than Nick has, both to each others disappointment.  Nick is barely the height of Andrew’s shoulder, whereas Andrew is having feelings for anything with legs – apparently, that’s how boys work. Jessi, their female friend, is also going through changes. In one of the episodes, she gets her first ever period. At least girl wise,  I think that they got it properly spot on.

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Andrew and his hormone monster, Maury. Their relationship is a bit… peculiar – Big Mouth, Netflix, 2017

I wouldn’t say that it’s the best written show in the world. I know that one of the reasons it’s on Netflix is because they wanted to make the most outrageous cartoon on television. I honestly think they managed it. It may be in the same vein as the Simpsons, Family Guy or King on the Hill but it has a certain… charming quality about it. Unlike the other shows, it feels like you can put yourself in their shoes, they’re just kids at the end of the day. The hormone monsters are pretty hilarious, and (though I wouldn’t say -they’re- true to life) the idea of crazy hormones is. At one point, Jessi is obsessed with finding a pretty bra. Most bras are nude, boring and comfortable. She wants something daring – bright red and gorgeous. It was funny, but also true to life.

I really recommend people watch it, as long as they’re 18+ of course!

Catch out a trailer down below!

 

[Header Image: Big Mouth, Netflix, 2017]