“I don’t want to marry a fool.” “Then you will have to take a husband over thirty, Blanche” – Widowers’ Houses, George Bernard Shaw (1892)

Happy Monday, readers! Welcome back to the library! My first piece of info this week is that my newest short story is out for publication – HERE – It’s called ‘Sleep’, about a woman who has had her child taken away from her due to… well I hope you can figure that out when you read it! It’s not long at all, and won’t take you any time to read! Please check it out!
Anyway, thank you all for letting me have a day off, I had a great birthday weekend, which meant no time to write! We did something a bit different for it this year, and went to see an outdoor play, at a famous author’s house – George Bernard Shaw’s house to be precise! I studied him in my undergrad, so we thought we’d go see something in the outdoor theatre. It was a really lovely evening too, and I didn’t get cold once, which is a shock as I am always cold!

G_Bernard_Shaw

Shaw when he wrote the play. At this point he was a young man! – George Bernard Shaw, Wikipedia

Shaw’s play begins as romcom (yes they existed in the late 1800s). On a holiday in Germany, on the Rhine, a young doctor, Henry Trench (along with his friend William Cokran), falls in love with Blanche Sartorius – she’s on holiday with her father Mr Sartorius, who feels like holidays are a great way to learn! The play really gets going in Act 2, after Trench realises that his prospective bride’s income derives from her father’s profits as a slum landlord (A slum landlord is a derogatory term for a generally absentee landlord with more than one property, who attempts to maximize profit by minimizing spending on property maintenance – you can min-max anything!).  This play is a debate about socialist ideas vs that of the conservative. Whilst no one in the play says they are socialist, and Henry is still willing to prosper for those who are less fortunate than him – he is very upset about having to do so. In the end it’s all happy families, but Henry and Blanche’s love is tested throughout. She’s a real fierce woman and he can’t take that. Nor can he take that his soon-to-be father-in-law is profiting off of those who are less fortunate than them, and he does not want to take their money. This is awkward as Mr Sartorius has told Blanche that she will have anything she wants, whether she is married or not! Blanche refuses to live off of £700 a year (around £20,000 a year nowadays if my calculations are correct. Sorry if that’s wrong.)

5687429-MI really liked this play. As it was in three parts, there was ample time to chat about it with my parents and @sebonthesilvermountain who tagged along for the ride! Even though it was based in the late 1800s there are things that still ring true for today! For instance, landlords will still abuse their tenants by refusing to do any work to their properties, and kick them out if they complain.
There were a few lines that still run true to day too – Marrying someone over 30 if you don’t want to marry a fool, everyone has a right to their own opinions even if they upset someone else – small quips like this that I really engaged with.
It was really nice to sit outside, have a picnic and watch something be performed in front of your eyes. The actors did amazingly in the evening warmth – I would have needed sunglasses! I really did feel like I had been transported back in time to the 1800s!

I really think you should all go and see an outdoor play. In the summer they’re beautiful, and they really bring you into the story!
Watch an adaptation HERE – It looked quite good from my brief look at it!

Have you ever seen an outdoor play? What about a George Bernard Shaw play? Would you ever go see one? Leave a comment down below!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s